Why God Made Eve from Adam’s Rib

Yesterday morning, I was reading “Cross Purposes” by D.James Kennedy. It’s been my devotional for the past few months that I read when I go out in the mornings before starting my writing.

Yesterday’s reading was titled “Eden Revisited”, which immediately caught my attention because it’s one of the subtopics for my next trilogy. The reading was about how the Last Adam (Jesus) came to redeem humanity and Creation from the choices of the First Adam.

Frequently when people read the Creation story, kids (and some of us adults) wonder why God took a rib from the side of Adam to create Eve. After all, He could’ve just created her from nothing or from the dust of the earth like Adam, but He didn’t. Also, why did God put Adam in a “deep sleep” before taking the rib? He certainly didn’t have to do that either. He used a very peculiar means to fashion the First Bride, but the Bible never really explains why.

Typically, most Bible teachers/scholars explain that Eve was taken from the side of Adam to show the side-by-side, helper/helpmeet relationship. Others say she wasn’t taken from his head to reign over him, nor from his foot to be trodden upon, but from the side since she would be so close to his heart.

Those interpretations are all well and good, but none of them ever felt quite “right” to me. Something always seemed missing or incomplete about those explanations. And the reason is that they were Man’s interpretations, and not necessarily the Bible’s or the Spirit’s.

Chuck Missler has often said that when you find something strange, peculiar, or out-of-place in the Bible, rejoice and then dig into it because there’s a treasure buried underneath. Now, I’ve heard that story countless times since I was young, but those questions had always been there.

However, the devotional exposed the answer by making various comparisons between the First Adam and the Last Adam, and then it went on to compare the First Bride and the Last Bride:  Eve and the Church. That particular comparison is not made anywhere in the Bible, but it’s quite interesting to examine the story further with that insight.

When the First Adam’s side was opened, God created the First Bride from his flesh/bone. When the Last Adam’s side was opened (pierced) on the cross, the Last Bride was created from His blood and the Spirit (signified by the water/fluid).

Many people fail to understand that the New Covenant didn’t begin with Jesus’s ministry, but AFTER the Crucifixion. The Church as a Body (or His Bride) was not manifested until AFTER the Day of Pentecost (the giving of the Spirit).

As for the “deep sleep” of the First Adam, this foreshadows the Death of the Last Adam. Then after he awakens (symbolizing the Resurrection), God brings the Bride to him.

Also in keeping with the model/type that Paul sets forth in 1 Corinthians, just as the First Adam was of the Flesh and the Last Adam was of the Spirit, the First Bride was created by the Flesh, but the Last Bride was created by the Spirit — the blood of the New Covenant mixed with the water/Spirit.

The Bible is all about the Story of Fallen Man and the Triumphant Redeemer, while the New Testament is primarily concerned with His Bride, or the Church. The Old Testament taken by itself is quite incomplete, with none of the Messianic prophecies being fulfilled at the close of Malachi. It’s like reading only half a book, but then never knowing how it’s going to end.

Interestingly enough, the Bible opens with the story of Creation, the Bride, then the Fall, but then the pattern reverses at the end:  Restoration, the Bride, Eternity.

Shouldn’t we have expected the Story to both begin and end with the relationship between the Man and the Bride?

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